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Agaricus Blazei and Its Role as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent
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Agaricus Blazei and Its Role as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent

Seraiah Alexander
Seraiah Alexander
May 18, 2024
2 min

Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM) is a medicinal mushroom native to Brazil and widely cultivated in several Asian countries. Also known as ‘Cogumelo do Sol’ in Brazil or ‘Himematsutake’ in Japan, the mushroom has been used as a staple in traditional medicine for decades due to its apparent healing properties. It has been used to boost the immune system, assist in cancer therapy, support gastrointestinal health, and reduce inflammation (1). As modern medicine begins to catch up with traditional knowledge, there has been a surge in research looking into the science behind the potential healing properties of AbM. In a recent study, scientists analyzed the chemical makeup and health benefits of an AbM extract to determine and evaluate its anti-inflammatory potential and its effect on human cells.

Study details and key findings

The main goals of the study were to map out the chemical profile of AgM to determine all of the substances present in it and examine how it affects human cells, specifically neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that plays a major role in our body’s immune response and inflammation process. To do so, the researchers concentrated AbM with alcohol and water to make a potent hydroalcoholic extract. By extracting with both water and alcohol, the researchers could draw out all of the potentially beneficial compounds with differing solubilities. They then identified and analyzed the various compounds in the extract to determine its cytotoxicity (cell-killing potential) and hemolytic (red blood cell damaging) activities. The extract was found to have a low potential for these two features, suggesting that the tested concentration is safe for human cells.

Furthermore, the researchers discovered 28 different metabolites in the extract, with mannitol being a major compound. Mannitol is a type of sugar alcohol that has been previously studied for its therapeutic properties (2). The mannitol content appeared to significantly reduce the release of myeloperoxidase, an enzyme linked to the body’s inflammation response. The reduction of myeloperoxidase suggests that the AbM extract has potential as a natural anti-inflammatory agent, further proving the possible therapeutic applications of the mushroom (3). 

Potential implications and future research

The study’s overall results concluded that AbM extract may be an effective natural treatment that could be incorporated as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. When used alongside conventional medical treatments, the extract could help enhance the effectiveness and provide a more holistic approach to treating certain disorders. Given its low cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity, AbM may also carry fewer side effects than standard treatment options. Though more research and clinical trials are required to fully establish the mechanisms of action and long-term safety, this study opens up doors for new research that could one day lead to well-studied natural treatments that mirror the mushroom’s history in traditional medicine.

References

  1. Campelo, Silva, Francisco Câmara, Hilton César, G Alves, Guilherme Julião Zocolo, Kalyne Almeida, and Maria Elenir. 2024. “GC/MS and 2D NMR-Based Approach to Evaluate the Chemical Profile of Hydroalcoholic Extract from Agaricus Blazei Murill and Its Anti-Inflammatory Effect on Human Neutrophils.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 322 (March): 117676–76. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2023.117676.
  2. Firenzuoli, F., L. Gori, and G. Lombardo. 2008. “The Medicinal MushroomAgaricus BlazeiMurrill: Review of Literature and Pharmaco-Toxicological Problems.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 5 (1): 3–15. https://doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nem007.
  3. Schreibman, David L., Caron M. Hong, Kaspar Keledjian, Svetlana Ivanova, Solomiya Tsymbalyuk, Volodymyr Gerzanich, and J. Marc Simard. 2018. “Mannitol and Hypertonic Saline Reduce Swelling and Modulate Inflammatory Markers in a Rat Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.” Neurocritical Care 29 (2): 253–63. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12028-018-0535-7.

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science
Seraiah Alexander

Seraiah Alexander

Content Editor

Table Of Contents

1
Study details and key findings
2
Potential implications and future research
3
References

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